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H.R. 806: Portable Fuel Container Safety Act of 2019
by outdoorwire. 02/20/19 08:32 PM
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Federal Legislation
02/20/19 08:32 PM
H.R. 806: Portable Fuel Container Safety Act of 2019.

Introduced: Jan 28, 2019
Status: Introduced on Jan 28, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on January 28, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Proposed bill text is available at: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation - Firearms
02/18/19 04:11 PM
H.R. 1296: To regulate assault weapons, to ensure that the right to keep and bear arms is not unlimited, and for other purposes.

Status:

Introduced on Feb 15, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 15, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation - Firearms
02/18/19 04:07 PM
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Federal Legislation
02/17/19 05:06 PM
S. 491: A bill to reaffirm the policy of the United States with respect to management authority over public land, and for other purposes.

Introduced: Feb 14, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 14, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 14, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation - Firearms
02/17/19 04:58 PM
H.R. 1262: To amend title 18, United States Code, to increase the age at which a rifle or shotgun may be acquired from a federally licensed firearms dealer, and for other purposes.

Introduced: Feb 14, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 14, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 14, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation
02/17/19 04:54 PM
H.R. 1276: To reaffirm the policy of the United States with respect to management authority over public land, and for other purposes.

Introduced: Feb 14, 2019
Status: ntroduced on Feb 14, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 14, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation - Firearms
02/17/19 04:49 PM
H.R. 1266: To amend title 18, United States Code, to require firearm assembly kits to be considered to be firearms.

Introduced: Feb 14, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 14, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 14, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Access Roundtable
02/14/19 03:55 PM
S.J.Res. 8: A joint resolution recognizing the duty of the Federal Government to create a Green New Deal.

Introduced: Feb 13, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 13, 2019

This resolution is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 13, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

GovTrack

Editor Note: A resolution is often used to state an intent to support or oppose an issue. A resolution becomes law ONLY if passed by both chambers of Congress with identical language and signed by the President.
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Federal Legislation - Firearms
02/13/19 03:59 PM
S. 459: A bill to protect the American people from undetectable ghost guns, and for other purposes.

Introduced: Feb 12, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 12, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 12, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation - Firearms
02/13/19 03:58 PM
S. 447: A bill to regulate large capacity ammunition feeding devices.

Introduced: Feb 12, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 12, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 12, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation
02/12/19 04:20 PM
S. 434: A bill to provide for a report on the maintenance of Federal land holdings under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Interior.

Introduced: Feb 11, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 11, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 11, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Access Roundtable
02/12/19 03:51 PM
On Wednesday, February 7, Congressman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) introduced a federal resolution to recognize a “duty” of the federal government to create a Green New Deal (GND). This blog discussed the GND in a post on the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis on January 31.

Addressing climate change may be a primary focus of the resolution, but “green” is perhaps a misnomer, as the resolution calls for action on issues well beyond climate or the environment generally. To effectuate the GND, the resolution calls for measures, among other things, including:

Creating jobs, including “guaranteeing a job with a family-sustaining wage, adequate family and medical leave, and retirement security to all people of the United States”
“Building a more sustainable food system that ensures universal access to healthy food”
“Providing all people of the United States with high-quality health care”
“Providing all people of the United States with affordable, safe, and adequate housing”
Stopping “historic oppression of indigenous peoples, communities of color, migrant communities, deindustrialized communities, depopulated rural communities, the poor, low-income workers, women, the elderly, the unhoused, people with disabilities, and youth”
Assuring “universal access to healthy food”
“Strengthening and protecting the right of all workers to organize, unionize, and collectively bargain free of coercion, intimidation, and harassment.”
Ensuring “access to nature”
Stopping eminent domain abuse
Assuring business competition that is “free from unfair competition and domination by domestic or international monopolies; and
“Providing resources, training, and high-quality education, including higher education, to all people of the United States”

Among its climate-related and environmental ambitions, the GND calls, among other things, for:

A “10-year national mobilization”
“Eliminating pollution and greenhouse gas emissions as much as technologically feasible”
“Guaranteeing universal access to clean water”
“Meeting 100 percent of the power demand in the United States through clean, renewable, and zero-emission energy sources”
“Upgrading all existing buildings in the United States”
“Working collaboratively with farmers and ranchers in the United States to remove pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from the agricultural sector”
“Overhauling transportation systems,” including through investment in zero emission vehicle infrastructure, public transit, and high-speed rail
Restoring ecosystems
Cleaning up hazardous waste sites
Addressing clean air and water generally, and protecting public lands, waters, and oceans
Investment through public sources and institutions
Providing worker training

Such broad proposals often face difficulty attracting sufficient consensus to gain approval. The resolution is attached here.
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Access Roundtable
02/12/19 03:43 PM
HIGHLIGHTS:

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) on Feb 7, 2019, released companion resolutions that provide a framework for prospective legislation on a Green New Deal (GND), an ambitious climate policy.
The GND proposals are instructive and can serve as a blueprint for a potential climate and energy package for the next Democratic president to propose to Congress, or to help inform a bipartisan infrastructure bill.
This alert details what is and isn't included in that framework, and provides some thoughts on where a GND goes from here.

The concept of a Green New Deal (GND) has been around for at least a decade, but was popularized recently by the nascent Sunrise Movement and freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.). In the months following the 2018 midterm elections, the GND has become a rallying cry of sorts for progressives inside and outside of Congress, a shorthand for a nebulous but ambitious climate policy that would transition the U.S. to 100 percent renewable or carbon-free electricity, recognize and address issues of environmental justice, and make significant investments in technological innovation and climate adaptation. Many Democratic presidential candidates – including Kamala Harris and Kirsten Gillibrand, among others – have declared their support for a GND, or at least the "idea" of one, but there were no specific policies to rally behind.

On Feb. 7, 2019, however, companion resolutions were introduced by Rep. Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) that provide a framework for prospective legislation on a GND (see Ocasio-Cortez's resolution and Markey's resolution). This alert details what is and isn't included in that framework, and provides some thoughts on where a GND goes from here.

What's in It

Any discussion of what these GND proposals are needs to start with what they're not – namely, legislation. Instead, they take the form of Sense of the Senate and Sense of the House resolutions, nonbinding statements of principles that express the views of the members of Congress who support them, but do not have any formal effect on policymaking.

Nonetheless, the proposals are instructive, as they represent the goals of a growing and increasingly vocal segment of the Democratic party, and can serve as a blueprint for a potential climate and energy package for the next Democratic president to propose to Congress. And there are some measures that he or she could do administratively through rulemakings.

The proposals begin with a statement of findings, referencing the conclusions from the October 2018 Special Report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the November 2018 National Climate Assessment from agencies across the U.S. government. These reports form the scientific basis for the need to reduce emissions by 40 percent to 60 percent below 2010 levels by 2030, and to net-zero global emissions by 2050, in order to stave off the worst effects of climate change.

The proposals then intrinsically link several issues confronting the U.S. and the world at large – including environmental degradation, income inequality, lack of access to healthcare, and wealth and earnings disparities by race and gender – and point out that climate change will only exacerbate these "systemic injustices" while acting as a threat multiplier that undermines our national security.

The goals of the GND are laid out in broad strokes: net-zero greenhouse gas emissions, job and economic security for affected industries and communities, infrastructure investment to adapt to climate impacts, clean air and water, and rectifying historic and ongoing environmental issues that disproportionately affect minority and low-income communities. The measures required to achieve those goals are described in similarly broad terms, with the tacit acknowledgment that future policies will go into the level of detail necessary to lay out exactly how those measures will work in practice. What can be said with certainty, though, is that the GND would entail a rapid and wholesale transformation of many aspects of the American economy.

The primary tasks are:

a transition to 100 percent renewable and zero-emission energy sources, which does not explicitly exclude nuclear power or fossil generation with carbon capture and sequestration
investments in resilient infrastructure, clean energy research and development, clean manufacturing, and assistance for industries and workers impacted by the transition away from more polluting industries
upgrades to the electric grid, water infrastructure, buildings, public transit systems and zero-emission vehicle infrastructure
community-led projects to mitigate and manage the health and economic impacts from climate change and conventional air and water pollutants
land use changes including afforestation and reforestation, improved soil management and habitat restoration

Notably absent in the GND resolutions is an explicit call to price carbon emissions. While the documents call for the federal government to "take into account the complete environmental and social costs and impacts of emissions," the lack of any mention of a carbon tax is noteworthy at a time when that policy is gaining momentum in both parties.

What This Means, and What Comes Next

Ultimately, the success of these resolutions will be judged by how many of the GND components eventually become enacted into law. And that will depend on a number of factors that will become evident over the coming days and weeks. First, the number of co-sponsors in each chamber will be illustrative, as well as their composition – that is, how many "Establishment" Democrats sign on, and how many presidential candidates throw their support behind the GND in whole or in part. Should the resolution come up for a vote in either chamber, the number of members of Congress voting in favor will be highly instructive as well, and could help determine whether the GND becomes an official plank in the Democratic party platform.

The breadth of the GND means that there will be many committees with jurisdiction over its component provisions. Whether members on those committees attempt to translate aspects of the GND into legislative language, and whether there are any bills that can garner bipartisan support, will provide insight into the feasibility and likelihood of successfully enacting parts of the GND into law in the coming years.

Lastly, at the risk of stating the obvious, it warrants mentioning that these resolutions are a partisan exercise, and are far from the kind of bipartisan legislation that could pass the Senate. The GND will be a highly expensive undertaking, and neither costs nor potential pay-fors are anywhere to be found in the text of the resolutions. So while a carbon price was intentionally omitted from the GND blueprint, a carbon tax will likely need to be part of any legislative package, if only as a way to raise revenue.

Taken together, this means that, should the GND be crafted into a fully formed bill, it is likely to include a price on carbon, a clean energy standard, building and appliance energy efficiency standards, federal funding for clean tech research and infrastructure improvements, and transition assistance for affected industries and low-income households. In other words, there are real similarities to the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009, often referred to as the Waxman-Markey bill, which passed the House in that year. However, it should be noted that companion legislation was never considered in the Senate at a time when Democrats controlled Congress and the White House.

Those deep in the trenches on these issues know that enacting the policies outlined in the GND resolutions will be a near-impossible feat, as confirmed by statements from key Republicans and some moderate Democrats. However, the enthusiasm and urgency presented by the backers of a GND bodes well for advancing climate and energy initiatives in bipartisan infrastructure packages in this Congress and in years to come.

Source: Lexology
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Federal Legislation - Firearms
02/09/19 08:40 PM
H.R. 1115: To amend the Consumer Product Safety Act to remove the exclusion of pistols, revolvers, and other firearms from the definition of consumer product in order to permit the issuance of safety standards for such articles by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Introduced: Feb 8, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 8, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 8, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.


Source: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation - Firearms
02/09/19 08:38 PM
H.R. 1116: To amend chapter 44 of title 18, United States Code, to prohibit the sale or other disposition of a firearm to, and the possession, shipment, transportation, or receipt of a firearm by, certain classes of high-risk individuals.

Introduced: Feb 8, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 8, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 8, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation
02/09/19 08:19 PM
H.Res. 109: Recognizing the duty of the Federal Government to create a Green New Deal.

Introduced: Feb 7, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 7, 2019

This resolution is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 7, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Summary: This resolution calls for the creation of a Green New Deal with the goals ofbachieving net-zero greenhouse gas emissions; establishing millions of high-wage jobs and ensuring economic security for all; investing in infrastructure and industry; securing clean air and water, climate and community resiliency, healthy food, access to nature, and a sustainable environment for all; and promoting justice and equality. The resolution calls for accomplishment of these goals through a 10-year national mobilization effort. The resolution also enumerates the goals and projects of the mobilization effort, including building smart power grids (i.e., power grids that enable customers to reduce their power use during peak demand periods); upgrading all existing buildings and constructing new buildings to achieve maximum energy and water efficiency; removing pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation and agricultural sectors; cleaning up existing hazardous waste and abandoned sites; ensuring businesspersons are free from unfair competition; and providing higher education, high-quality health care, and affordable, safe, and adequate housing to all.

Text is available at GovTrack
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All About Water
02/08/19 08:04 PM
EPA and the Corps of Engineers have finally proposed a new definition of “waters of the United States” to replace the Obama-era definition. The proposed definition is consistent with the executive order issued by President Trump in February 2017, which sought a regulatory definition similar to the more restrictive view of jurisdiction suggested by Justice Scalia in the Rapanos decision.

Essentially, the proposed definition utilizes a “baseline concept” that jurisdictional waters include only waters within the ordinary meaning of the term, such as oceans, rivers, streams, lakes, ponds, and wetlands, and that all waters are not necessarily “waters of the United States.” As such, the proposed rule includes traditional navigable waters, including the territorial seas, tributaries that contribute perennial or intermittent flow to such waters, certain ditches, certain lakes and ponds, impoundments of otherwise jurisdictional waters, and wetlands adjacent to other jurisdictional waters.

Traditional navigable waters are those waters that are currently used, were used in the past, or may be susceptible to use in interstate or foreign commerce. These types of waters have been historically regulated because they are “navigable-in-fact,” as they were traditionally used as highways over which trade and travel were conducted for commerce. This category now includes the territorial sea and all waters subject to the ebb and flow of the tide.

Tributaries of traditional navigable waters are regulated. Under the proposed rule, a tributary is a river, stream or similar naturally occurring surface water channel that contributes perennial or intermittent flow to traditional navigable waters. Other waters are also regulated. These include lakes and ponds that are traditional navigable waters, or contribute perennial or intermittent flow to traditional navigable waters, and lakes and ponds that are flooded by jurisdictional waters. Impoundments of any jurisdictional water continue to be regulated.

Only certain ditches are regulated. Ditches are broadly defined as artificial channels used to convey water. Ditches that satisfy any of the conditions to be a traditional navigable water are regulated. Also regulated are ditches constructed in a tributary or that relocate or alter a tributary if the ditch also satisfies the conditions of the tributary definition, as well as ditches constructed in an adjacent wetland as long as those ditches also satisfy the conditions of the tributary definition. Any ditch, as defined, that is not included above is not regulated.

Of course, certain wetlands are regulated. However, the wetland must be adjacent to jurisdictional waters, such as traditional navigable waters or a regulated tributary, lake, pond, impoundment or ditch. To be adjacent, the wetland must abut or have a direct hydrologic surface connection to jurisdictional waters. “Abut” means to touch at least at one point or side of a jurisdictional water. A direct hydrologic surface connection occurs as a result of inundation from a jurisdictional water to a wetland or via perennial or intermittent flow between a wetland and a jurisdictional water. A wetland that is physically separated from jurisdictional waters by upland or by dikes, barriers or similar structures and also lacking a direct hydrologic surface connection to such waters is not adjacent.

The proposed rule seems to provide the “bright line” and ease of application the previous administration touted when the existing rule was published. However, it clearly is more restrictive than the existing rule and will likely be the subject of litigation when finalized.

Source: Lexology
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Access Roundtable
02/08/19 07:59 PM
On January 31, 2019, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced plans to amend up to 182 Endangered Species Act (ESA) recovery plans, which potentially cover over 305 animal and plant species, over the next year. These amendments will revise each recovery plan to include “quantitative recovery criteria” as part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals. USFWS kicked off this 12-month push by releasing a notice of availability of 26 draft recovery plan amendments, covering 42 species found in eight states (AZ, CA, CO, HI, NM, TX, UT, and WA).

ESA recovery plans are intended to provide a roadmap for listed species’ recovery and to supply guidance to USFWS—as well as states, conservation partners, and affected landowners and industries—on how to minimize threats to the species and move towards recovery. The addition of “quantitative criteria for what constitutes a recovered species” is intended to give USFWS “objective, measurable guidelines” to help determine when a listed species has recovered such that it can be downlisted or delisted altogether.

In its notice of availability, USFWS requests comments on its first tranche of ESA recovery plan amendments by April 1, 2019. A dozen animal species and 30 plant species are covered by those recovery plans, including two Hawaiian seabirds, six Texas karst invertebrates, a Washington pygmy rabbit, and a number of cacti. The USFWS notice of availability requests comments on these draft recovery plan amendments from local, state, tribal, and federal agencies, as well as nongovernmental organizations and the public.
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Federal Legislation
02/08/19 07:36 PM
S. 367: A bill to provide for the administration of certain national monuments, to establish a National Monument Enhancement Fund, and to establish certain wilderness areas in the States of New Mexico and Nevada.

Introduced: Feb 7, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 7, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 7, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation
02/07/19 04:12 PM
S.47 Update -

Introduced: Jan 8, 2019
Status: Ordered Reported on Jan 9, 2019

The committees assigned to this bill sent it to the House or Senate as a whole for consideration on January 9, 2019.

Added to the Senate’s floor schedule for the next legislative day on Feb 7, 2019.

Full text available at: https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/116/s47/text
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Federal Legislation
02/07/19 03:54 PM
H.R. 1026: To provide for consistent and reliable authority and funding to meet conservation and deferred maintenance needs affecting lands under the administrative jurisdiction of the Department of the Interior and the Department of Agriculture, and for other purposes.

Introduced: Feb 6, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 6, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 6, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation - Firearms
02/06/19 06:01 PM
H.R. 971: To amend title 18, United States Code, to prohibit the possession of a firearm by, or the disposition of a firearm to, a person who has been convicted of a misdemeanor crime of animal cruelty.

Introduced: Feb 5, 2019
Status: Introduced on Feb 5, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on February 5, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Wildlife
02/01/19 04:33 PM
On January 28, 2019, the Superior Court for San Diego County upheld the California Fish and Game Commission’s (“Commission”) 2015 decision to list the gray wolf (canis lupus) under the California Endangered Species Act (“CESA”). (Cal. Cattlemen’s Assn. v. Cal. Fish & Game Com. (Super. Ct. San Diego County, 2019, No. 37-2017-00003866-CU-MC-CTL).)

CESA defines an “endangered species” as “a native species or subspecies of bird, mammal, fish, amphibian, reptile or plant which is in serious danger of becoming extinct throughout all, or a significant portion, of its range due to one or more causes, including loss of habitat, change in habitat, overexploitation, predation, competition, or disease.” (Cal. Fish & G. Code, § 2062.)

According to the administrative record, gray wolves historically inhabited most of the United States, including much of California, until they were extirpated from California almost 100 years ago. In December 2011, a lone gray wolf known as OR-7 dispersed from northeastern Oregon’s gray wolf population and was observed crossing the Oregon-California border in both directions multiple times. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (“Department”) projected that gray wolves from Oregon might attempt to establish a breeding population in California in the foreseeable future, but recommended to the Commission that the intermittent presence of an individual gray wolf in California did not warrant listing under CESA. After the Department’s recommendation, the Commission received evidence that OR-7 was traveling with a female mate and at least two gray wolf pups on the California-Oregon border, and that it was highly likely they had been traveling together within California. As we reported here, the Commission rejected the Department’s recommendation, and voted to list the gray wolf under CESA.

Agriculture and ranching groups (California Farm Bureau Federation and California Cattlemen’s Association, respectively) challenged the listing decision on the basis that the gray wolf did not meet the criteria for listing set forth in section 2062; specifically, the groups argued that the listing was improperly based on the presence of a non-native subspecies of gray wolf, that the intermittent presence of a single wolf did not warrant a finding that the gray wolf’s range included California, and that the gray wolf was not at risk of extinction throughout its entire range, which extended beyond California. The court disagreed, holding that section 2062 permits the listing of native species in addition to native subspecies, and that furthermore, the Commission’s scientific finding that OR-7 possessed some genetic markers of a native California subspecies (canis lupus nubilus) was entitled to deference. The court also held that the Commission could reasonably find that listing was necessary to protect the gray wolf from extinction in California based on the intermittent presence of OR-7, the female gray wolf, and the wolf pups, along with the possibility that a breeding population might be established in California in the foreseeable future. Finally, the court followed the California Third District Court of Appeal’s holding in California Forestry Association v. California Fish & Game Commission (2007) 156 Cal.App.4th 1535, 1540, that the term “range” as used in section 2062 refers to a species’ California range, not its total range, and therefore the gray wolf was eligible for listing based on the risk of extinction within California.

Source: Lexology
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Federal Legislation
02/01/19 04:28 PM
S. 308: A bill to direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey certain Federal lands in San Bernardino County, California, to the San Bernardino Valley Water Conservation District, and to accept in return certain non-Federal lands, and for other purposes.

Introduced: Jan 31, 2019
Status: Introduced on Jan 31, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on January 31, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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Federal Legislation - Firearms
02/01/19 04:25 PM
H.R. 939: To amend title 18, United States Code, to require federally licensed firearms importers, manufacturers, and dealers to meet certain requirements with respect to securing their firearms inventory, business records, and business premises.

Introduced: Jan 31, 2019
Status: Introduced on Jan 31, 2019

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on January 31, 2019. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Source: GovTrack
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